My Blog

Posts for: April, 2010

By contactus@dockessler.com
April 27, 2010
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

A few weeks ago I received a request to nominate professional colleagues to a "best dentist in the state" list for a magazine.

I dislike these things intensely because rather than promote true quality, they become a popularity contest. Anonymously rating a professional colleague for a magazine is not the same as rating a local restaurant. My patients and their families and friends deserve the best oral health care available - not the results of a magazine's marketing campaign.

I considered nominating myself as "best dentist" in each category, but decided to chuck the whole thing in the trash.

End of story.

 


By contactus@dockessler.com
April 13, 2010
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

It's springtime, and you're thinking of getting yourself into shape for the summer. Remember that staying hydrated is important, especially when you're working out on a warm day.

What's the best thing to drink? If you want to keep your teeth in prime condition, consider ... WATER!

Sports drinks, on the other hand, have a very high acid content. According to the American Dental Association, high acid content in beverages weakens the enamel, making teeth more susceptible to bacteria. Bacteria slip into the cracks and crevices of teeth and erode the enamel. The sugars in sports drinks also exacerbate the situation and encourage the bacterial growth.

Scientists from New York University College of Dentistry recently confirmed that prolonged consumption of popular sports drinks can damage tooth enamel and soften the underlying dentin, leaving teeth weak and prone to tooth sensitivity. While sports drinks provide a burst of energy, excessive consumption was shown to cause erosive tooth wear, a condition in which acids destroy the tooth's smooth, outermost layer and seep underneath into the bonelike material.

The ADA said sports drinks should not be an everyday beverage for adults, and it is very important for younger people to avoid excess intake.

Drinking plenty of water not only hydrates our bodies but can also help balance the acid and sugar intake that causes tooth erosion.

If you have any questions, please feel free to call (203-797-8070) or email us at office@dockessler.com.

Happy Spring!